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CUT & PASTE vs. COPY & PASTE
by Phil Ball


Q. What is the difference between cut and paste and copy and paste?

A. Both are commands used to move something from one place to somewhere else. These commands can be used in most programs and are very useful to move text, files, or photos around. The only difference is what happens to the subject moved: if you copy and paste, the text can be found in both places. If you cut and paste, the text is found only at the new, pasted location; it has been removed from the original location.

When you Cut and Paste or Copy and Paste, the information resides on the Windows Clipboard, which is an invisible place used to temporarily hold information that you have cut or copied. You can then tell the same program (or another program) to "paste" the information to a new location. The information stays on the clipboard even after being pasted until you cut or copy something else which will replace the info you placed there earlier.

There are four ways to perform these movements of text, files, or photos. First select (highlight) the text or photo that you want to copy. Then, either:

1. From the Edit menu, choose EDIT > CUT (or COPY). Then choose EDIT > PASTE to paste it.

2. Click the icon that looks like a pair of scissors to cut. Click another icon to paste. The icon varies but usually looks like a clipboard.

3. Right-click the selected text and choosing Cut or Copy from the context menu. Then Right-click the location where you wish to put the text and choose Paste from the context menu.

4. Use hot-keys such as Ctrl + C for copy, CTRL + X for cut, and CTRL + V to paste.

There is no difference between using any of the above methods. Choose the easiest method or the one you prefer.

While cut or copy and paste is most commonly used in documents to move text around, note that it can also be used in photo editors and can even be used to move whole files from one place to another.

Published: Courier 6/20/15 - Page 7A